In my studio, new work in progress

I am currently working on a series of ceramics for a group exhibition I am in next May ( 2 May – 8 th June 2014) at the Manly Art Gallery & Museum, selected for the Australian Ceramic  Association’s Biennial Exhibition, ‘The course of objects; the fine lines of inquiry’, curated by Susan Ostling. “the environment and nature as a source for ideas; the aesthetics of still life; rigorous material investigation; the figure as a source of delight and wonder; and aspects of function.”

The ceramics are hand built stoneware vessels which I have often re-fired several times to build up layers of glaze and underglaze paints. Paintings in the background are works in progress for my next solo exhibition at Art House Gallery, Sydney.

IMG_1043 IMG_1042 IMG_1034 IMG_1046

IMG_1041

Entrance to my studio

IMG_1048IMG_1100

Works in progress

IMG_1064 IMG_1065

Experiments using oxides on white slip on hand built stoneware forms, before firing.

IMG_1140 IMG_1141

Experiments using oxides on white slip on hand built stoneware forms, after the first bisque firing, still cone 10 Stoneware firing to go.

IMG_1206IMG_1207

 

Works after final stoneware firing, with the iron of the clay now emerging through the slip.

Ken Mihara and Kevin Lincoln at Liverpool Street Gallery

A great show which unfortunately is now finished at Liverpool Street Gallery, 243a Liverpool Street, East Sydney, 16 November – 21st November, 2013. Really beautiful and sophisticated ceramics by Japanese ceramic artist, Ken Mihara, complimented by reductive emblematic still life and seascape paintings, by Kevin Lincoln. Both body of works interplay and mirror one another with a reductive poetic and subtle palette.

Ken Mihara, ‘Serenity in Clay’

http://www.liverpoolstgallery.com.au/public_panel/exhibition.php?id_EXH=142

“The aesthetic qualities of serenity and the sublime coalesce within Mihara’s work. In essence, these qualities are the scents of Japan, a culture which has traditionally searched for beauty within wabi-sabi austerity, spiritual simplicity, and the cherishing of patina. The natural landscapes of his high-fired stoneware facades were borne through multiple and extremely difficult kiln-firings, with each firing revealing a new element to a work’s clay flavour. His new forms exhibit a stark, bulb-esque minimalism. Mihara’s new works pulsate with a relaxed and assured confidence in his own. Furthermore, the new work also exhibits a far greater range of tones, from the poetically austere to vivid oranges and blues, which are a result of a revamped firing technique that he has further tweaked from the experiments of his past Kigen (Genesis) series. His deeply spiritual works poignantly strike at the heart, and his new works exhibit the artist leaning further towards minimalistic simplicity.” Yufuku Gallery, Tokyo

All multi-fired stoneware, ‘Kigen (Genesis)#3’, 23 x 14.5 x 39.5 cm, ‘Kigen (Genesis)#4’, 42 x 23.5 x 26.5 cm, ‘Kodak (pulse)#4’, 41 x 19.5 x 30.5 cm, ‘Kigen (genesis)#1’, 74.5 x 20.5 x 44 cm, ‘Kei (Mindscape)#2’, 43 x 31.5 x 41 cm, ‘Kodah (Pulse)#5’, 25 x 19.5 x 24 cm

IMG_1081 IMG_1082 IMG_1093IMG_1078 IMG_1085 IMG_1079 IMG_1084 IMG_1091 IMG_1083 IMG_1090 IMG_1089 IMG_1088 IMG_1092

Kevin Lincoln, ‘Still Life and Landscapes’

http://www.liverpoolstgallery.com.au/public_panel/exhibition.php?id_EXH=143

Ghosts of still-life are held within the minimal abstracts. The sensuous curve is perhaps a detail of the edge of a bowl against a vase, or the strong horizontal line where a bottle sits on a table. But they need not be read as such, the artist instead demands that we allow the weight within each work to take hold, feel the density of each colour, each form and take the time to allow a response to develop within us. Lincoln’s paintings are not a quick fix — they are breathtakingly obtuse. Generally more textured than the meticulous surfaces of the abstract paintings, the elements in the still-life paintings have a disconcerting solidity against the indistinct glowing backgrounds on which they sit. Like a miracle, wine and fishes hover in an apparition on the canvas. The intimacy engendered, even in the most expansive of the still-life paintings, is borne from the personal references the artist places within each work. An invitation to the exhibition of an admired artist, a familiar pot from the artist’s collection, a bowl of figs or a shiny aubergine bought for lunch, these items are as much a glimpse into the artist’s life as the shadowy self-portrait reflected in a mirror.” Styles and forms – Contemporary Australian Painting, Shandong Publishing Press, China, 2004.

IMG_1080

IMG_1086 IMG_1087

‘Two Sake Bottles’, 40 x 46 cm, ‘Freycinet Peninsula’, 76.5 x 92 cm, ‘Recherche Bay Tasmania’, 86.5 x 112 cm

Sydney Ball, ‘The Stain Paintings’, Sullivan+Strumpf

The exhibition of Sydney Ball’s ‘The Stain Paintings 1971 – 1980’, has just finished at Sullivan+Strumpf Gallery, 709 Elizabeth Street, Zetland, Sydeny, 26th October – 16 November 2013

An inspiring exhibition of some of Sydney Ball’s earlier works that has been resurrected from the artist’s studio and re exhibited at Sullivan+Strumpf. One of these works, ‘October Fields’, was also exhibited in the recent Sydney Contemporary Art Fair by the gallery. The work held up really well amongst more contemporary works, in fact I think it looked stronger and fresher than a lot of other works displayed. It is also inspiring to see an exhibition of an artists work who has been paintings a long time, gone through the ups and downs of taste and fashionability in the art world, and now at 80 years, the artist is again recognized and his works reinvigorated and acknowledged.

http://sullivanstrumpf.com

IMG_0986IMG_0985IMG_0984IMG_0983

Translucent Stains 1976 – 80 (works downstairs), all enamel and acrylic on cotton duck, ‘Great Falls’ 273 x 585 cm, ‘October Fields’, 272 x 482 cm, ‘Oceania’, 303 x 372 cm, ‘Columbus’, 274.3 x 274.3 cm

Sydney Ball (b. 1933, Adelaide) was in the vanguard of Australian artists who elected to live and study in New York (1963-1965). He enrolled at New York’s Art Students League, where he encountered lecturer and mentor Theodoros Stamos, who introduced him to artists of the New York School including Willem de Kooning, Lee Krasner, Robert Motherwell and Mark Rothko. The Canto paintings (and subsequent Persian and Modular series) exhibited on his return to Australia introduced hard-edge abstraction, which prompted curator John Stringer to later write that; ‘Ball established himself as a prophet at home by generating large canvases… that seemed to have no precedent in Australian culture.’

Begun during Ball’s second stay in New York from 1969 to 1971, the inaugural Stain series was exhibited at Sydney’s Bonython Gallery in 1973. TheStain paintings were distinguished by their unprecedented scale, but most notably by a new painterliness.

Although colour remained the primary concern, painterly abstraction introduced fresh challenges and an unaccustomed freedom, as Ball began to work on the floor with access to all sides of a painting. Gone were the precisely defined edges, the flatness that had characterised his earlier series, displaced by canvases flooded with splashes and spatters of colour, permitting a fresh openness and luminosity. The Stain series of around 100 paintings preoccupied Ball for almost a decade from 1971 to 1980.

Reflecting on the series in 2013, Patrick McCaughey, who had visited Ball in New York, makes the observation; ‘Each painting is a fresh encounter as if Ball set out never to repeat himself… The Stain paintings are one of the triumphs of Australian art in the 1970s… How good it is to see them again and what miracles of vitality and enterprise they are.’

                             4 Sydney Ball ‘The Stain Paintings 1971-1980’ in conversation with Wendy Walker Uploaded 2 weeks ago                                                                                                                           An interesting interview with Sydney Ball.

IMG_0988
IMG_0989
IMG_0990
Details of the paintings
IMG_0987
Early Stains and Opaque Stains 1971 – 75, (works upstairs)
All enamel and acrylic on cotton duck, “Orient Journey’ 183 x 244 cm, and ‘Cembelin’, 183 x 244 cm